November 15, 2010

John Harbord, Bruce Sabine, and Joe Ronnlof represent some of the best anglers in Clearwater, FL and on Monday November 15th they went on their first of four full days of fishing on the Wanderer. While these fellas are used to pulling Snook and Tarpon out of the north side of Tampa Bay, they were more than ready to tackle the big Costa Rican meat fish.

On their first day Bruce was the hot rod catching two magnificent Cuberra Snappers. As with Matty’s Broomtail the day before, these fish were given to the villagers in Garza to make one heck of a sopa de pescado (fish soup).

November 14, 2010

November 14 was a big day for the Wanderer. In the morning, Matty and client Eduardo Barrios caught two little White Tunas, then deep jigged for a nice 25lbs. White Tuna. Then Matty hooked up this massive 50lbs. Cabrilla (Broomtail Grouper).

The fight was short but violent, and about three minutes after this picture was taken, Matty took a 45 minute nap in the cabin.

After picking up Craig at Garza, they went 25 miles offshore seeking the blue water.

After boating several 20-30lbs. Yellowfin Tunas, Eduardo hooked up a beautiful Striped Marlin. He put on a show, but managed to cut the line off on a stray piece of driftwood less than 100 feet from the boat. Eduardo did everything right, but the Stripey got away.


All told they caught eight Yellowfins with the big one weighing 40lbs. Great trip!

October 31, 2010

Client Juan Adriatico book the Wanderer on October 31 and got things off to a quick start. First he got to work on the inshore reefs with a few 12lbs. Yellowfin and White Tunas.

Then, the line screamed off when it was hit by a 50lbs. Amberjack.

Early in the afternoon Juan got the hook into this awesome 45lbs. Dorado.



Hopefully this is a sign that with El Nino gone the fish are starting to resume their normal feeding habits.

Mr. Adriatico wasn’t done yet!

Captain William and the boys put Juan on two massive Cuberra Snappers to cap off Opening Day. Both weighed over 30lbs. with the big one nearing 50lbs. Great start to what will be a great season!

October 30, 2010

Captian William and the crew of the Wanderer are back on the water and catching some serious fish. After one year of service, this 31′ T-Craft has been freshly painted and armed with new tackle from Star Rods, Penn, Shimano and a whole array of Williamson Jet Poppers.

You will not find a better-armed boat in all of Costa Rica.


On October 30th, the Wanderer was fresh off the hill and got her first action with our family from Nosara Paradise Rentals: General Manager Javier, his brothers Grevan and Eduardo, Marlon the painter, and friends Carolina and Emily. They had a great time and caught a nice Amberjack and a few White Tuna. The staff of Nosara Paradise Rentals work year round to keep our clients smiling…it’s great to see them smiling big as well!

October 15, 2010

Captain William has Alex and David getting the Wanderer ready for another year of billfish combat by refitting the fighting chair, plus the yearly maintenance and paint work to keep the Wanderer running smoothly and looking great (and of course catching fish). Captain William and crew can’t wait to get back in the water and start filling the fish boxes.

The Wanderer‘s first year was a success beyond all of our wildest dreams. From the early stages of rebuilding and refitting the boat in Florida to the final rigging in Costa Rica to the day-to-day excellence exhibited by Captain William and the crew, every element has come together in perfect harmony to make this boat a legend in the Nosara area after just one season. Of course none of this would be possible without you, our friends from around the world who have made the Wanderer part of your stay in Nosara.

 

We are all super stoked to finally get Captain David’s new ride the Explorer delivered from Nicaragua and prepped for battle. We are just now starting the final rigging before she’s ready to catch Cuberra, Snook, Roosters and anything else that swims.


On October 14th Captain David took a friend’s Panga boat out to scout new spots and caught 40 Yellowfin Tunas…that’s not a typo, that’s FORTY fish. What a great first trip! If you are ready for a trust test of angler skill, book Captain David and the Explorer before his calendar fills up.

Advice For First Time Travelers to Costa Rica

Costa Rica projects an image of rainforest canopy tours, crystal clear blue water, and the free-spirited Pura Vida mentality. While these things are all as good as advertised, many first time travelers to Costa Rica may be surprised to learn that they suffer from a unique set of modern problems. This guide will help soften the blow of the culture shock and prepare travelers for a great trip to Costa Rica.

First the pleasant surprises. English is spoken throughout the country and American dollars are an acceptable form of currency. For casual purchases, keep some Colones in your wallet; the exchange rate is roughly 600 Colones/ $1 USD. Also, the entire country is wired in 110V so American appliances will work without cumbersome adapters.

The most common entry point to this country is the San Jose Airport (SJO) which has surprisingly modern customs and immigration terminal. It is here that some of the shine of the country may wear off if you are not prepared.

For starters, there are signs posted reminding tourists that it is illegal to engage in sexual intercourse with minors. There are reminders that possession of Cocaine, Marijuana, and Opiates is also quite illegal. Those who think that Costa Rica is a third-world lawless zone should go elsewhere, because the Policia in Costa Rica do not have a sense of humor regarding these serious crimes.

The taxi stable at the airport is the one place in the entire country where travelers should be on the lookout for pickpockets and shady unlicensed cab drivers. These ne’er-do-wells may promise an exclusive tour of the surrounding countryside that you can’t get anywhere else; these can lead to horror stories of tourists being robbed and stranded in an unfamiliar land. The best counter to this problem is to arrange transportation ahead of time with a reputable transport company.

Over the last few years the roads in Costa Rica have been improved tremendously, however there are still places where the pavement gives way to dirt, rocks, and mud. Also there are virtually no roads in the country wider than two lanes. Therefore as you leave San Jose factor in additional travel time for highway problems. Vehicle breakdowns, accidents, and mudslides can delay traffic for hours, so be prepared to stop for a while.

Once out in the countryside, the Pura Vida mentality will take hold of you. Rural Costa Ricans are friendly, honest, and generally concerned with the safety of their foreign guests. Violent crime is virtually non-existent outside of San Jose and the fishing, ecotourism, and volcanoes truly do live up to their world-class reputation.

A final note: Customs charges a $36 deportation tax when you leave the country regardless of your destination. This fee is due on site in cash or else you cannot leave the country. This is non-negotiable and can be a burden for backpackers and other travelers on a budget who are down to a few pennies when it’s time to leave. Make sure you set aside this money before you spend yourself out.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/4939315

August 15, 2010

On August 15th Craig enjoyed his last day in Costa on the Wanderer along with good friends Andrew (from Playa Garza), Andrew (from Playa Jacksonville), and the Georgia peach Paula. It was a relaxing trip without the hustle and bustle of the TV crew, but Craig still found time to catch a 150lbs. Striped Marlin.

With a meter-long razor-sharp spear and a top speed over 60 knots, these fish are known for their aggressive fighting tactics and bulldog strength. This particular Marlin had the attitude of a bareknuckle street-fighter, but Craig stayed vigilant on the reel and Alex was right there to safely bill and release this massive marine monster.


Of course the greatest victory for FishingNosara crews is the safe release of all billfish. As with dozens of other Marlins and Sailfish caught by the Wanderer this season, this brutal behemoth was safely released back into the blue water.

Captain William and the boys are feeling on top of the world these days. The fish are biting, the clients are smiling, and the schedule is filling up fast.

It’s hard to believe that it has been a year already since completing the Wanderer. This boat represent a classic story of a few dudes getting themselves WAAAAYYYY in over their heads, but persevering to succeed beyond even their own imaginations.

August 14, 2010

Craig Sutton and the Inside Sportfishing crew had one thing on their minds when they hit the water on August 11th: Marlin.

This bad boy came tearing up the spread and hit the naked ballyhoo rig so hard it almost pulled the rod holder right off the boat. After an amazingly acrobatic 25 minute fight, the fish was finally in range to be billed. With the stress of the fight and the huge stature of the fish, we decided to release without removing it from the water.

On the final day of filming, the crew got a Blue Marlin hooked up and tailwalking for the cameras, but this one got away. They retreated to the reefs and caught a whole boatload of Yellowfin Tunas and Dorados.



Look for episodes of Inside Sportfishing from Nosara in the near future. It was a blast to host these seasoned world travelers and treat them to some world-class fishing and down-home fun!